Easy Dorm Recipes

Article Written by Emily Gabel, Sophomore and SAND (Student Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics) Member

Living in a dorm creates many challenges, due to the minimal space and cooking resources available. In a dorm, you do not have the ability to cook a full meal. Although some dorms have kitchenettes in the common areas, is it extremely rare that students utilize them to cook meals more than once a week. With these challenges, it becomes necessary to get creative when wanting to make a meal from the dorm building late at night.

There are many options for dorm breakfast recipes. My personal favorite dorm breakfast meal is overnight oats. Overnight oats are the solution to having a breakfast meal ready for you when you wake up, and a nutritional and tasteful one at that.

Overnight oats require a jar or container with a lid, oats, milk and any sort of add ins you prefer, such as fruits, nut butters or seeds. All of these ingredients are sold at campus markets. To prepare overnight oats fill a glass jar or container with old fashioned oats, to the level of which you think you’ll eat the next morning. Next, fill the jar with milk so that the oats are covered. If you are needing a caffeine pick up, pour 1 cup of brewed coffee into the container with oats, instead of milk. Finally, add toppings to the oats and any sort of spices or flavorings you wish. Simply cover the container with a lid and place in the fridge overnight and you have yourself a nutritious breakfast ready when you wake up!

A dish I love to make in my dorm for lunch or dinner is a Mexican corn salad. For those who would never choose to eat a salad for a meal at the dining hall, this may just be your kind of salad. This salad, unlike what you’re offered at the dining hall, is not lettuce based. A Mexican corn salad has a corn base, which is made from cooking canned corn in the microwave for approximately 3 minutes. After cooking the corn, add black beans, peppers, onions, cilantro and cheese to the corn to make a complete salad. A yogurt based dressing is paired well with this salad. You can make a simple yogurt based salad dressing with products purchased from campus markets. The dressing consists of plain yogurt, lime juice, paprika and cumin.

Not only are these recipe suggestions easy to make in your dorm room, but they are great ideas to mix and match with items served in the dining halls!


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March Superfood: Kale

Kale, the dark green leafy cabbage is March’s featured superfood! Kale is a superfood because it is one of the most nutrient-dense vegetables on the planet, carrying powerful antioxidants like quercetin and kaempferol.  Kale is a member of the cabbage family and is related to cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower. Curly kale, or Scots kale, is the most popular type of kale although there are a variety of kale to choose from.  Leaves can be purple or green in color with a curly or smooth shape.

Ways to Prep Kale

Although it may sound silly, there is serious science behind massaging your kale before you eat it.  Cruciferous vegetables and leafy greens contain intense disease-fighting phytochemicals, or messengers that deliver antioxidants, hidden in the fibrous stems.   Massaging, chopping or blending kale will break the nutrient-dense cell walls and will release antioxidants that heat can’t perform alone.  Massaging your kale will also soften the fibers of the leaves.

Kale-Friendly Ideas:

  • Blend kale into a smoothie
  • Incorporate kale with your salad greens
  • Bake kale until crisp to make kale chips
  • Wilt kale into your favorite curry
  • Stir kale into your favorite soup

What are the Health Benefits?

A single cup of raw kale (about 67 grams or 2.4 ounces) has 33 calories, 6 grams of carbohydrates, and 3 grams of protein.   

  • Vitamin A: 206% of the RDA (from beta-carotene).
  • Vitamin K: 684% of the RDA
  • Vitamin C: 134% of the RDA
  • Vitamin B6: 9% of the RDA
  • Manganese: 26% of the RDA
  • Calcium: 9% of the RDA
  • Copper: 10% of the RDA
  • Potassium: 9% of the RDA
  • Magnesium: 6% of the RDA

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Sustainability and Food Waste

What is sustainability and food waste?

Sustainability is the study of how systems produce everything it needs for organisms (you and me) and the environment to remain in balance. Sustainability includes three pillars, which includes economic development, social development and environmental protection. The goals of sustainability include ending poverty and hunger, improved standards for education and healthcare, economic growth, and health of the land, air and sea. Food waste is the act of discarding or using food in a non-food that was safe and nutritious for consumption. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United States estimates that each year one-third of all food produce is wasted.

How is Miami University Dining contributing to sustainability and reducing food waste?

  1. Miami University Dining utilizes recycling to help protect the environment.
  2. All trays were removed from buffet dining locations. Since our buffet locations are “all-you-can-eat” you have the ability to go back to buffet lines as many times as you like to get more food. By removing trays from all buffet locations, this encourages students and guests to fill up one plate at a time, instead of filling a whole tray.
  3. Dining staff utilizes batch cooking daily during service. This is where staff prep recipes and items prior to service, but do not cook them until they are needed. Once the food is cooked it is policy that it be thrown out after service has ended, regardless of how much is left. If it is not cooked then it can be frozen and saved for later use. By utilizing batch cooking, this allows staff to cook as needed and reduces the amount of produced food items that are thrown out, therefore reducing food waste.

How can you contribute to sustainability and reducing food waste in the dining halls?

  1. When you are dining at a buffet location try to only fill your plate with the amount you will eat. Start with small portions and if you are hungry after eating your first plate you have the ability to go back for seconds, and so on, until you are full and satisfied.
  2. When you are dining at an ala carte location save your leftovers for a later meal, instead of throwing them out.
  3. Be intentional with the items you purchase at markets or grocery stores so that you can help reduce food waste. When shopping at markets or grocery stores look at expiration dates on the items you purchase. Think about if you will be able to eat the products before the expiration date. If not, then reconsider why you want that item and what an alternative could be to reduce food waste.

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A Healthy Diet Starts Now!

Article Written by Erin Jung, Sophomore and SAND (Student Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics) Member

College students are notorious for their not-so balanced diets. We tend to reach for fast food, take out, packaged snacks, and microwavable meals. While these items are wonderful for convenience and are found at a reasonable price point, our health can often suffer from our less-than-stellar lifestyle choices.

There are several reasons as to why we should start caring more about which foods we’re fueling up on at this time in our lives. Some choices will have an immediate impact, while others can change the course of our health for years to come. Eating healthy can provide sustained energy over each day, and it can also improve our mood. Farther down the line, the right diet can help prevent a number of different diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

Fortunately, Miami’s dining halls consistently have healthful options available at all times of the day. It can be tempting to fill up on calorie dense-nutrient poor foods, but with a little bit of self-discipline, every student has the potential to put the right foods on our plates for a delicious and balanced meal.

So what are some of these healthy habits that we should be implementing now? Here are some things that all college students should at the very least consider practicing at this stage of life.

Eat a filling breakfast

It’s very cliché, but breakfast indeed is the most important meal of the day. Our brains and bodies require energy in order to take on the day ahead, and the most promising way to supply this energy is by eating a hearty breakfast. Yes, it may be easier just to grab a granola bar on the way to class, but this alone will not keep most students full and focused for very long. An inexpensive yet filling choice is oatmeal, as it’s extremely versatile, and you can add toppings of your choice to make it even tastier.

Say “no” to fast, fried food

While everything is okay in moderation, fried foods do not offer us any substantial nutritional benefits. In fact, lots of people complain about feeling sick or sluggish after eating these kinds of foods. Every once in a while it’s okay, but as we get older, we really need to focus on fueling our bodies with whole, unprocessed foods.

Sticking to water

You’ve all heard it a million times, but there’s a reason why people push the importance of drinking water – our bodies love this stuff! Soda and juice are high in sugar and quite frankly a waste of calories. Get yourself a high-quality, reusable, insulated water bottle to keep your water cold all day. It’s definitely worth the investment—you’ll save so much money by choosing not to buy plastic water bottles each day before class! If you like a sweeter taste to your water, try adding fruits to your water for a healthy alternative. You can find infused waters in Commons locations all across campus.

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The key is to start small, implementing one or two of these tips at a time. With consistency and persistence, every college student can start eating better now to set the stage for the future of our health.


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National Nutrition Month: College Eating Habits

Article Written by Sarah Erb. Junior and SAND (Student Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics) Member

     Making sure to eat breakfast before my 8:30am is always the last of my worries on a Monday morning.  My biggest concern? Making sure my pants aren’t inside out before I walk into a lecture hall. So why fuss about what I eat while I’m in college?  I need fast, easy, and filling food.

    Without eating before your 8:30am, your body goes all morning while your brain and stomach are searching for fuel! Your stomach is rumbling before class is even over and by ten o’clock you have a hunger headache. Sometimes are bodies are giving us warning signs to tell us something is up. Usually, when your body needs some nutrients to go about its day, it will tell you! It may just be screaming via tummy rumble. Your 10:00 am headache may also be disrupting your concentration because you are dehydrated. Not getting enough water can make our minds cranky and affect our mood. Being hungry and dehydrated can cut into our study time and hold us back from completing daily tasks.

     Fast and easy foods for us college students usually mean something hot and greasy, something uptown with friends or between classes. Being ‘full’ and being ‘stuffed’ are two different things. If you’re feeling stuffed after eating then you probably should try slowing down while you eat your next meal. Make sure you have a glass of water to sip on in between bites. Talk and enjoy what you’re eating. Make sure to note how what you ate makes you feel later. Are you feeling greasy, sluggish, and bogged down? Maybe it is because of the grilled cheese, fries, and soda combo you chose to splurge on. The simplest (and grossest) way to tell if you’re being healthy on a daily basis: check your bathroom schedule.  Drinking eight glasses of water a day will have you using the latrine frequently! After a few of these eight ounce glasses, urine will be the desired pale yellow color. Looking at your bowels is another way to access your health from the past few days. If you haven’t had one of these in awhile then maybe it might be time for some fiber! Try whole grain bread options, or experiment with eating dark green leafy veggies.

Being healthy doesn’t have to be a stress on top of all our schoolwork! Carving out time in our days to fuel our bodies (and minds) with food will go a long way. We all want to get A’s but our bodies are also telling us signs of how well we are treating them! Eat breakfast, drink water, and remember to listen to what your body is asking for.


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National Nutrition Month: Improve Your Immune System

Article Written by Sarah Hagedorn, Junior and SAND (Student Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics) Member

Improving your immune system can start with foods and vitamins you consume in your diet. This article will give you 5 steps in working toward the improvement of your immune system!

Step 1

Start every meal by loading your plate half full of fruits and vegetables.

Step 2

Choose whole grains. Pass up refined grains. What does this mean? Whole grain is 100% untreated grain. This includes foods such as 100% wheat bread, oats, brown rice, whole-wheat pasta, and whole-wheat tortillas.

These whole grains have more nutrients and vitamins. Plus they can help prevent weight gain because whole grains are digested slower than refined grains (white bread, white rice, bagels). This means less of the bread you love to eat will be stored as fat. Look for 100% whole grains on the label.

Step 3

Choose lots of Vitamin C. Foods high in vitamin C include lemons, strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, broccoli, oranges and many more.

Step 4

Eat healthy fats. All fat is bad right? No! Bad fats include trans and saturated fats. Healthy fats are monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats; they are found in olive oil, nuts/seeds, and avocados.  Bad fats would be fats found in hamburgers, fries, and other greasy food examples.

Step 5

Drink and eat your calcium. Choose yogurt, milk, almond milk, coconut milk, soymilk, or low fat cheese every day.  Calcium is essential for our bodies to consume while we are young. Right now, our diet and physical activity determines how healthy our bones will be in later life.  Think about your bones and pour yourself a glass of milk!


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What’s Wrong with My Typical College Diet?

Article Written by Abby Larson, Junior and SAND (Student Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics) Member

      The average college lifestyle is not conducive to healthful habits. Erratic schedules, inconsistent sleep, limited budgets, and constant temptations are characteristic of college life added to the already present challenges of a healthy diet.  In this blog I’ll detail some college staples and easy changes to flip the “freshman fifteen” to “freshman fit”.

Pizza

Organization events, Uptown, delivery services… pizza is everywhere for college students.  It’s easy, fast, and delicious.  Pizza varieties tend to be carb- and fat-laden, and deficient in important nutrients. Rather than the greasy, processed variety, try making pizza using whole wheat tortilla or naan bread with tomato sauce and topped with feta cheese, spinach, chicken, and basil. Substitute any other toppings for a pizza that’s just as satisfying without the guilt.

Ramen

Ramen is notoriously simple to make. The flavor pack for the chicken variety contains an alarming 1,820 mg of sodium, and the FDA recommends consuming at most 2,300 mg per day. With a lot of sodium and little other nutritional benefits, ditch the flavor pack for seasonings such as garlic, pepper, or fresh herbs along with vegetables and a protein, like chicken, beef, shrimp, or an egg.  

Ramen frequently takes the form of a midnight meal. The timing of meals is as important as the meal itself. Indulging late at night usually doesn’t involve nutrient-dense foods, and on top of this, these calories are more likely to be stored as fat in your body.

Dining Halls

In dining halls, it’s easy to fill your plate up (maybe two or three times) with all the mac and cheese, fries, and chicken strips that fit.  Doing so can result in overeating certain nutrients like trans-fat or carbohydrates and missing out on others like fiber or vitamins.  Instead, make the most of the meal plan swipe by going in with a plan and filling up on the healthy options. A balanced plate of vegetables, fruits, protein, and dairy leads to a more satisfying, and nutritious, experience.

In college, and in life, unhealthy and healthy options are available. By thinking about what you chose to eat and making healthful food choices will help you begin to make lifestyle changes. Preparing food by oneself takes a little more preparation and work but improves the taste and nutritional quality. Ultimately, healthy choices involves lifestyle changes that promote balance and variety. Making small changes can lead to significant improvements.


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March National Nutrition Month

Happy March! And Happy National Nutrition Month!

Did you know the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics puts on a campaign to promote nutrition education and information annually in March? The campaign began in 1973 as National Nutrition Week, but due to popularity it became National Nutrition month in 1980. National Nutrition month promotes the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and its members, Registered Dietitians, to the public and media as the most credible sources of nutrition information.

Each year National Nutrition Month focuses on a theme to share the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits. National Nutrition Month’s 2018 theme is: Go Further with Food! The foods you choose to eat make a difference, whether it is choosing healthy snacks or reducing your portion sizes, in your overall health.

Go Further with Food Tips!

  • Eat Breakfast: start your morning with lean protein, whole grains, low-fat dairy, fruits and vegetables to jump start your day.
  • Make half your plate fruit and vegetables: they add color, flavor and texture to your plate, plus the added benefits of vitamins, minerals and fiber. Make 2 cups of fruit and 2 ½ cups of vegetables your daily goal.
  • Watch portion sizes: reducing your portion sizes and eating slowly will increase your satiety cues and allow you to not overeat. Follow the MyPlate guidelines when making your plate
  • Resolve to Reduce Waste
    • Plan meals and snacks based on the foods you have on hand.
    • Get creative with leftovers. Transform them into soups, salads or sandwiches.
    • Be mindful of portion sizes and avoid throwing out excess food.
    • Donate extra foods, that are still safe to eat, to a local food pantry or shelter.

What is Miami Dining doing for National Nutrition Month?

  1. When you are in the dining halls look out for nutrition facts posted near serving lines.
  2. Check out our Nutrition Walls in Garden Commons and Western Dining Commons for nutrition information and pamphlets.
  3. We will be focusing on our March Superfood: Kale! Find Kale at our dining locations and learn more about the benefits of this superfood and how to use it in many different ways!
  4. Follow us on social media! We will be posting nutrition tips, nutrition trivia questions, recipes, dining hall hacks, blog posts from our Registered Dietitians and Dietetic students, and more!
  5. Tag us in your #HealthySelfie Take a picture of your food or your food and you! Tag @MiamiUDining and use the #HealthySelfieMiami to be entered into our National Nutrition Month Raffle!

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Student Spotlight – Jenny Nieman

Q: What is your title/role?

A: I am a Student Manager at the Starbucks on Maple Street.

Q: So are you a “barista?”

A: Yes, I am a certified barista through Starbucks. But as a Student Manager, I’m also in charge of delegating tasks, pulling sandwiches and pastries, that kind of stuff.

Q: What is your background like? Major, tc.

A: I grew up in Urbana, Ohio, in a super small farm town. I’m a major in Communications and Photography so I’m a very visual person. Working at Starbucks has allowed me to use some of my visual and artistic skills to work with marketing and advertising for the store.

Q: How did you get into the food service? Did you have prior experience?

A: I had no prior experience before coming to college. I worked as a camp counselor and I worked picking berries but never actually in food service. Freshman year I worked at Garden Commons for a semester and then I came to Starbucks and have been here for the last year and a half.

Q: What is the most exciting part of the job?

A: The time goes very quickly when there’s a line out the door. It’s exciting to just be able to move from one cup to another, and once you get in a rhythm you can just go.

Q: How would you describe your relationship with the other student employees?

A: Working in such a stressful environment in such small quarters kind of forces us to get to know each other and learn how to work with each other. This has allowed me to not only meet incredible people, but also to form friendships that I wouldn’t have otherwise found.

Q: How would you describe your relationship with guests?

A: When guests are nice, it makes your day. When they come in, ask you how you are and are very friendly it makes your day. Sometimes, people can get frustrated when we’re busy, but we just offer the best customer support we can and keep the drinks moving.

Q: How would you describe yourself personally? Hobbies? Interests?

A: Well my roommate has a dog, so I love to play with her. I’m also super outdoorsy. I love to hike, camp, kayak, all that. I’m very artistic; I love to do photography, paint, do crafts. Mostly I just love to be outside.

Q: What is one thing not many people know about you?

A: People know this once they get to know me, but I’m wildly optimistic. I find the good in literally everything.

Q: What is your favorite drink to prepare? What is your favorite drink to drink?

A: My favorite drink to prepare is the Starbucks Double Shot. It’s just ice and espresso. You shake it up real well, pour it in a cup and top it with milk. Once you top it off with milk, it’s all swirly and really pretty, so it’s fun to make. My favorite drink to drink is the London Fog Latte, which is Earl Grey Tea, and I like to put soy milk in it. Some people say it tastes like Froot Loops, but I think it’s really good. It’s a nice comforting tea drink.

Q: Favorite TV show?

A: I love The Office and New Girl. Again, I’m incredibly optimistic, so anything that’s a happy sitcom. Any comedies are usually my cup of tea. …haha I didn’t mean to make that pun.

Q: Cat or dog?

A: Dog 100 percent.

Q: What have you learned so far from Starbucks?

A: I’ve learned how to be more patient and how to handle a lot of stress. We can have a lineup of probably fifty cups and I no longer get stressed about it. It just pushes me to go a little faster, so my time management has definitely been improved.

Q: Any advice for applying/working for Miami University Dining?

A: Since I’ve mostly worked in Starbucks, which kind of feels like it’s own separate branch, I can’t give a ton of advice, but I would recommend it. I’ve enjoyed my time here and I plan to work here until graduation. Once you start, you usually end up meeting some pretty cool customers and you work with some great people. So having that experience has been a good one that’s taught me a lot.

Q: Anything else?

A: We’d love for you to come to Starbucks, but be patient and friendly. You’ll get a great drink and a great interaction.


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