Healthy Miami

Freezer Smoothies

“Fresh, healthy, easy-to-prep, and cheap” – four things that college students love to hear. Freezer smoothies start your day off right and are the perfect snack to cool off from the heat. To make it a “freezer smoothie”, divide or mix fruits in plastic bags, seal the bags and place them in the freezer for up to 6 months. When you’re ready, mix the ingredients plus some milk or water in a blender until the consistency is smooth.

Here are just a few simple suggestions and recipes to help your freezer smoothies go to the next level.

Buy Frozen

According to ABC News, the minute fruits or veggies are picked, they begin to lose nutrients, so exactly when it’s plucked, and how long after harvesting you eat them impacts there nutritional value. Most frozen fruits and veggies are frozen shortly after they’re harvested, which means a lot of the vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants are locked in. Buy frozen fruits and veggies when prepping smoothies because it’s healthy and makes your prepping a lot easier.

Look at the Label

When you buy frozen, look at the label. A lot of companies like to sneak in extra sugars or substitutes to freeze their products. The ingredients should be whatever fruit or veggie you are buying. Fruits already carry natural sugars and your smoothie will be sweet enough without extra sugars.

Buy a Blender

If you don’t have some sort of blender already, purchasing a decent blender isn’t going to break the bank! Check Target or Amazon for some affordable options. This Oster Classic Blender will do the job. Whatever you decide, shop smart. You don’t have to drop $200+ for a good blender!

Recipes 

Smoothies are highly customizable and you can replace ingredients easily.  You would be surprised with how many combinations people come up with once you do your research. A great site to research smoothies (and other recipes), is Yummly. It has tons of filters so you can narrow down what you are looking for. For example, if you are allergic or don’t like bananas in your smoothies, you can filter that out of your searches. Check it out!

Here are few recipes to get you started with your smoothie game.

Strawberry Banana Smoothie – This three ingredient recipe is easier than trying to spell “b-a-n-a-n-a-s” (it’s tough without a little help from Gwen Stefani).

Pineapple Mango Banana – If you can’t go to a tropical island this summer, replicate it in your kitchen. This video includes the Pineapple Mango Banana smoothie recipe and a few others! 

25 Quick and Easy 3-Ingredient Smoothies – A creative chart of some ambitious and unique combinations.


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5 Foods to Help You Stay Hydrated

Summer is in full swing and staying hydrated is the most important thing you can do to beat the heat. While drinking water and other hydrating liquids is crucial, foods can also play a part in helping you stay hydrated. Here is a list of five hydrating foods to help you out this summer:

Cucumbers

Fun fact: Cucumbers have the highest water content of any solid food. (96.7% to be exact). They are a great snack for a hot summer day and are available on salad bars throughout campus. Include some cucumbers in your next meal to help keep you hydrated!

Iceberg Lettuce

Iceberg lettuce tends to get pushed aside for options such as spinach or romaine lettuces, which both contain more vitamins and nutrients, but with 95.6% of water, Iceberg Lettuce is a great supplement and addition to your next meal. Use iceberg lettuce instead of bread for burgers and sandwiches, or instead of tortillas to make a lettuce wrap.

Celery

It may not have negative calories like many people believe, but with just 6 calories per stalk and 95.4% water, celery is a hydrating snack that helps curb your appetite due to it also being high in fiber. Add a little peanut butter or ranch, snack bliss without the dehydration.

Watermelon

Watermelon is 92% water. I mean, it has “water” in the name…

Various fruits (Grapes, cherries, blueberries, raspberries, strawberries)

All of these fruits are made up of 80-91% water. Having a sweet treat is needed on a warm day. Any of these will be good for you when you are outside and hangry from the sun. Pro-tip: Freeze some grapes (the best way to eat grapes) for a portable, nutritious and easy to eat to snack.

For more hydrating foods, click here!


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How to Survive Finals Week

  1. Plan out your meals ahead of time. Creating a meal plan for the week will keep you fed and energized. Having one less thing to worry about can also reduce some stress. Who wants to be trying to figure out where to eat when you can’t even figure out question one of the practice exam? Need some pointers on meal planning? Check out this post from a few weeks ago!
  2. Make a study schedule. While you’re coming up with a meal plan, go ahead and create a study schedule as well. This will keep you organized and make sure you have enough time to study for every exam. Want to make it more fun? Color-code it with your favorite, brightest colors to help keep everything straight.
  3. Eat a healthy breakfast. Jumpstarting your metabolism early on will help you stay focused throughout the day. Plus, who doesn’t love a good yogurt parfait?
  4. Choose a good studying location. While campus can get crowded during finals week, it’s important to find a study environment that works for you. If you can’t be productive if you’re around your friends, don’t study with them. If the second floor of King isn’t for you, don’t attempt to work there. Throw on some comfy clothes and find a quiet spot that is most your style and you’re set to crush that studying! As far as dining locations go, Maplestreet Station is a good study spot. If you study best in your dorm room, grab a meal to-go from Garden Market or load up on healthy study snacks at Market Street at MacCracken.
  5. Try meditating. Meditating for just 10 minutes can help you destress and focus on the task at hand. There are a bunch of apps for guided mediation and Spotify has a few playlists as well. If you want more tips on how to meditate and the benefits of practicing mediation, read this post!
  6. Workout. Much like meditation, exercise can help you clear your mind, destress, and re-energize you after a grueling study session. Endorphins released during your workout will perk you up, and get you ready for the next exam.
  7. If all else fails, coffee is your friend. Just make sure you’re also drinking a TON of water so you don’t get dehydrated and keep the caffeine intake under control to avoid getting jittery. Green tea is a great alternative.
  8. Let it go. Once the exam is over, it’s over. Don’t let the stress overwhelm you! Treat yourself after a hard exam with your favorite sweet treat, like ice cream from Miami Ice!

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Eat Healthier With Proper Preparation

It is inevitable that some day you will need to plan and prepare your meals. This important part of “adulting” isn’t so hard when you’re a college student on a meal plan, but it’s always good to make sure you know the basics.

We all know how hard it can be to throw together good, healthy meals if you have a busy schedule (which, who doesn’t?), so make sure you’re getting the proper nutrients by planning your meals ahead of time. One way to approach this is to pack your meals ahead of time. For example, you could try some of these recipes for lunches. Doing the work ahead of time makes these quick grab-and-go items in the morning. Just be sure to pack foods that will sustain you throughout the day, mixing both simple and complex carbs.

A lot of times, being in a hurry to get out the door in the morning leads to skipping breakfast and being hungry the rest of the day. This can lead to making poor decisions with regard to food.

“Who cares if this bag of chips is 200 calories? I’m hungry!”

If you make breakfast ahead of time, you can easily grab it to-go no matter how much you overslept. For example, if you enjoy a savory, egg-centric breakfast, try this recipe for baked egg muffins! If you’re looking for something sweet, you could make overnight oats with just a few ingredients or these baked oatmeal cups!

Breakfast, lunch and dinner aren’t the only way you can plan ahead. Realistically, you’re still going to want to snack during the day, so make sure those snacks are healthy and homemade when possible. You could pre-portion nuts or even make your own flavored ones like these. If you want a nut-free option that is still protein packed, try roasted chickpeas, which are super easy to make ahead!

The most important aspects of meal prepping are to utilize your freezer and make large batches of yummy, healthy food ahead of time. Don’t be afraid to pre-portion your servings to avoid overeating either. Dedicate one day a week to plan next week’s meals and you’re set!


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Tasty Ways to Top Toast

It seems like every month there is a new trend in toast, so we weeded out the good and the … not so good to bring you a list of some of our favorite ways to eat toast! Try them all and tell us your favorite, but don’t just butter us up — we really want to know!

Ricotta

My personal favorite way to eat toast is to top a slightly browned slice of sourdough with ricotta and lox (with a piping hot cup of coffee on the side, of course!). This recipe is super easy and is pretty much a more gourmet version of a bagel.

If you’re looking for something a little more sweet, you could top a piece of ricotta toast with a fruit like figs, strawberries or blackberries. Some other savory options include a caprese toast with ricotta, basil, and tomato slices (preferably from a grape tomato) with a balsamic drizzle or toast topped with ricotta, beets and arugula. You can find even more ricotta toast options here.

Avocado

Most people have at least heard of avocado toast, but have you tried it? While it might feel a little “extra” to mash up a ripe Haas, it is most definitely worth it. Give your avo-toast a little mediterranean zest with lemon juice, grape tomatoes, kalamata olives, a hard-cooked egg, and a drizzle of tahini.

For a fresh, simple taste, top your toast with avocado, arugula and lemon juice. For an afternoon avocado-filled adventure, you could barbeque some shrimp and toss it atop a bed of avocado toast and spray with lime juice. You could even add feta cheese crumbles and scallions to your classic avocado toast or find more recipes here! Avocado toast is versatile meaning you can add pretty much whatever you’d like!

Greek Yogurt

Bread topped with … yogurt? Heck yes! Put down the smoothie bowl and pick up a butter knife to spread your smoothie onto a piece of toast! Top toasted bread with greek yogurt, chia seeds and fresh fruit for a healthy twist on two breakfast classics. You could use any flavor of greek yogurt and any type of fruit.

Try strawberry greek yogurt with cocoa nibs for a chocolate-covered strawberry toast. Or add a chocolatey-styled greek yogurt to toast and drizzle with caramel sauce for a sweet breakfast treat.

Hummus

Top toast with hummus for a protein punch! You can add any veggie to hummus toast, but we love to add roasted asparagus, asiago cheese, and fresh lemon juice. For a refreshing treat, add cucumber and cracked pepper to your hummus toast. You could also top toast with both hummus and avocado (in slices) for a protein double whammy. Add radishes, arugula and pepper to that for a little bit of bite. If you’ve never tried microgreens, you definitely should. This delicious, fresh produce packs a healthy punch in a tiny package. Add them to your hummus toast along with feta cheese for a delicious snack anytime of day. You could also add roasted kale and your favorite spice!

Tag us in your artsy food pictures and share your favorite recipe!


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Talking National Nutrition Month with Chef Mary Johnson

March is National Nutrition Month, which is a nutrition education and information campaign, focusing on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

So, we reached out to some of our talented and experienced chefs and asked them to share their advice for making healthy food choices this month and beyond. Today’s chef is Chef Mary Johnson.

Chef Johnson is an executive chef, overseeing hot production, grade manger and the bakery at the Demske Culinary Support Center, where all centralized production for campus takes place. Gingerbread houses and fruit carvings are her hobby.


Q: Tell me a little about yourself and your background in dining.

I am from Louisiana and have a passion for cooking and renovating. I am a mother of seven and after having the privilege of being a stay at home mom for 32 years, I returned to school and graduated from Cincinnati State with a culinary degree. I’ve been with Miami University for 11 years.

My experience at Miami has been challenging, rewarding, and fulfilling. I began as a senior cook, was quickly promoted to food production leader, and then chef. I am now an executive chef. I have worked in dining halls, restaurants, and hot production at the Demske Culinary Support Center (DCSC).

Gingerbread houses and fruit carvings are my hobby. I have recreated, in gingerbread, many of the buildings on campus including Lewis Place, McGuffey, Old Main, Upham Hall, and more. I have done many fruit carvings for different events at the president’s home, dining halls, and NACUF’s competitions.

Q: Tell me what you do here at Miami, the different tasks you are responsible for and what role you play in our dining services as a whole.

I am the executive chef at DCSC. Currently my responsibilities include oversight of hot production, garde manger and the bakery at DCSC, where all centralized production for campus takes place. My day-to-day duties include monitoring all activity between the three units, handling issues that develop during the day, notifying the units if products will be late, if substitutions will be made, and clarifying any discrepancies in orders. My most important role is to make sure all our customers get quality products, correctly, and on time. If at any time this does not happen, it is my responsibility to make the necessary corrections are made with as little inconvenience to the customer as possible.

I have input into menu choices, setting rotations for hot production’s soups and sauces, garde manger’s Uncle Phil’s Express items, and the desserts and pastries from the bakery. I also consult with different staff on event menus, providing information as to what my departments can provide. The bakery provides all the cakes, cookies, and specialty items for the “Me to You” program, and provides input on holiday promotions as well.

Q: The theme for National Nutrition Month this year is “Put Your Best Fork Forward” to emphasize that each of us holds the tool to make healthier food choices. What does this theme mean to you and in what ways do you believe people can make healthy changes to their diets during National Nutrition Month and beyond?

I think “Put Your Best Fork Forward” means that every bite counts and that taking small steps to changing our eating habits can be positive steps to, hopefully, lifetime changes. I think the key to success is finding a variety of healthy foods you enjoy. It is easy when you love what you eat. The MyPlate guidelines suggest half your plate should be filled with vegetables and fruits (adding slightly more veggies than fruits) and the other half should be filled with grains and proteins. Of course, color is key, so include a colorful mix and you will get plenty of nutrients. Oh, and don’t forget your dairy. A glass or low fat or skim milk is a great choice.

Q: In what ways do you think students at Miami can “Put their best fork forward”?

I think they can opt for healthy options offered by our dining services. Healthy options are a must on Miami’s menu. We work hard to give our students quality food. We give student access to ingredient and nutritional information and want to help them make informed, intelligent decisions. Healthy grab-and-go items are readily available if students are pressed for time. They should make a conscious, concerted effort to find healthy food they like, follow the MyPlate guidelines, make it colorful and it will be easy for them to “put their best fork forward.”


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Talking National Nutrition Month with Chef Scott Rouse

March is National Nutrition Month, which is a nutrition education and information campaign, focusing on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

So, we reached out to some of our talented and experienced chefs and asked them to share their advice for making healthy food choices this month and beyond. Today’s chef is Chef Scott Rouse.

Chef Rouse is an executive chef at Miami University with over 30 years of experience in food service. Chef Rouse is over Garden Commons, Martin Dining Hall and Dividends, in addition to the Middletown and Hamilton campuses, helping plan and execute Miami’s dining services.


Q: Tell me a little about yourself and your background in dining.

I’ve been in food service for 30 years. I’ve done many different types of food service. (i.e. Hotels, Fine dining, Senior living, Contract Food Service, Colleges, office buildings, and Free Standing Restaurants.) I’m a graduated from the New England Culinary Institute in May of 1991 and I love Creole & Cajun food.

Q: Tell me what you do here at Miami, the different tasks you are responsible for and what role you play in our dining services as a whole.

I’m one of the executive chefs here on campus. I’m over Garden Commons, Martin Dining Hall, Dividends, the Middletown campus and the Hamilton campus. I help plan and execute many different aspects of dining, from special dinners to limited time offers, to the regular four-week menu rotations. I oversee daily production of menu items and assist where needed; anything from covering for someone on their break in the production kitchen to stir-frying in the Asian concept Zen.

Q: The theme for National Nutrition Month this year is “Put Your Best Fork Forward” to emphasize that each of us holds the tool to make healthier food choices. What does this theme mean to you and in what ways do you believe people can make healthy changes to their diets during National Nutrition Month and beyond?

I believe people can make healthy food choices at any time, not just during National Nutrition Month. We always have healthy options available from baked fish to roasted vegetables to grilled skinless chicken breast. Not to mention all of the tasty vegan and vegetarian offerings. The hard part is sticking to those choices long-term to actually change your eating habits. I know this is much easier said than done. Believe me, I love a good cheeseburger just as much as the next person.

Q: In what ways do you think students at Miami can “Put their best fork forward”?

Neale Donald Walsch said “Life begins at the end of your comfort zone.” and I couldn’t agree more. Try something new. Maybe try the three sisters stew or the roasted cauliflower or some other dish you haven’t tried. Vegan, vegetarian or otherwise. Even if it’s just a bite of something new. You may just find your new favorite dish.


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Talking National Nutrition Month with Chef Casey Johnson

March is National Nutrition Month, which is a nutrition education and information campaign, focusing on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

So, we reached out to some of our talented and experienced chefs and asked them to share their advice for making healthy food choices this month and beyond. Today’s chef is Chef Casey Johnson.

Chef Johnson is an executive chef at Miami University, overseeing Armstrong Student Center, Bell Tower Place and King Cafe. Chef Johnson, originally from Ohio, went to culinary school in New York, interned in West Virginia and found his way back to Ohio before taking his current position with Miami University’s dining services.


Q: Tell me a little about yourself and your background in dining.

My name is Casey Johnson. I’m originally from Toledo, OH and have lived in both New York and West Virginia for some time. I attended college at The Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY and, while in school, I did my internship with the Greenbrier Hotel & Resort in White Sulphur Springs, WV.

After graduation I participated in the M.I.T program where I was a teaching assistant/sous chef at The Caterina de’ Medici restaurant on campus for Chef Alberto Vanoli for a year. Once I completed the M.I.T program, my wife and I decided to move back to Ohio for her to attend school, while living in Toledo. I worked in a couple different Italian restaurants and finally became sous chef for a local restaurant, Mancy’s Italian Grill.

From there I moved into a food & beverage director position for Hilton Garden Inn where I was one of the opening managers for their Findlay, OH property. During that time, my wife was accepted into the graduate program here at Miami University, so we moved south and I ended up getting one of the executive chef positions here at the university.

Q: Tell me what you do here at Miami, the different tasks you are responsible for and what role you play in our dining services as a whole.

I’m responsible for overseeing the management of Armstrong Student Center, Bell Tower Place, and King Cafe. That includes the day-to-day needs of each property, recipe management, proper food safety, and concept development. The chefs on campus are here to back up and assist the front line staff members. We obviously do a lot of the planning and technical recipe work, but the front line staff plays the biggest role in our dining service department on campus.

Q: The theme for National Nutrition Month this year is “Put Your Best Fork Forward” to emphasize that each of us holds the tool to make healthier food choices. What does this theme mean to you and in what ways do you believe people can make healthy changes to their diets during National Nutrition Month and beyond?

“Put Your Best for Forward,” to me, kind of summarizes what I had already planned for my year. Between the birth of my daughter at the end of 2015 and me turning 30 this year, I’ve decided to make healthier choices in my own life. I’d like to make the next decade of my life the healthiest one I’ve had thus far.

I’m a huge believer and advocate for the Farm-to-Table movement. I feel this movement can really help increase the healthier options on our plates. Eating whole, unprocessed food, and as locally as possible, is always going to be the best choice when trying to make a healthier choice. I believe this quote from Michael Pollan’s In Defense of Food sums up my belief on healthy food, “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.”

Q: In what ways do you think students at Miami can “Put their best fork forward”?

I believe that if the younger generation helps to continue this Farm-to-Table movement by supporting local farmers markets and making seasonally, local choices, the demand for these product will increase, as will supply (hopefully). This will help make these whole, unprocessed foods more readily available, allowing more Americans to eat healthy at a lower cost.

The students here at Miami and at every university really do have the power to change something as long as they pay attention to the choices they make in their food. “Putting Their Best Fork Forward” is not only good for their health but the health of this planet.


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Healthy Meal Substitutions Worth Trying

A common misconception with food is that in order to make smarter, healthier choices, you have to give up all your favorite meals. That isn’t necessarily true. If you get creative, and a little adventurous, you will find there are plenty of ways to still enjoy your go-to meals by substituting ingredients with other, healthier alternatives.

We found a couple meals that fit the bill with simple substitutions that can be made to add a fresh, healthy twist. These meal substitutions are definitely worth trying in your home kitchen.

Breakfast

Everybody loves to start the day with pancakes from First Stop or Pulley Diner. While you’re home for spring break, try a new twist on this breakfast staple. You can replace regular pancake batter with two bananas and two eggs for a gluten-free meal! Try this basic recipe with suggestions for common add-ins! Added bonus: bananas are high in fiber and antioxidants.

Lunch

If you’re a fan of Boneless Wing Wednesdays, you can switch it up a bit by replacing the chicken with cauliflower! It’s super easy to make this vegetarian dish and definitely worth a try. Just bake some cauliflower, cover it in as much sauce as you want and bake again. Here’s a recipe straight from the source. Replacing chicken with cauliflower makes this dish more vitamin rich, lower in calories, and gluten-free.

Snack

A great snack for the warmer months ahead is one that will bring with it a twinge of nostalgia. Throwback to childhood summers of pouring juice into popsicle trays, but now imagine an updated, more health-conscious version. Try replacing sugar-rich juice, found in the popsicles of your youth, with greek yogurt. All it takes is your favorite sliced fresh fruit, plain greek yogurt, and a natural sweetener like agave nectar or honey. The creamy and delicious treat will melt in your mouth … literally.

Dinner

Even fans of The Q can get in on this whole substitution thing. Barbeque pulled pork gets a healthy twist by replacing the meat with … fruit! Jackfruit can be prepared so that it has the texture of the average pulled meat. Adding barbeque for flavor and then using it on a bun, taco shell, or plate of nachos turns the fruit into a great meat substitute. This cuts down on cholesterol and calories and adds in more nutrients. It is definitely worth giving a try in your home kitchen!


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Talking National Nutrition Month with Chef Kiril Gallovitch

March is National Nutrition Month, which is a nutrition education and information campaign, focusing on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

So, we reached out to some of our talented and experienced chefs and asked them to share their advice for making healthy food choices this month and beyond. Today’s chef is Chef Kiril Gallovitch.

Chef Gallovitch is Miami University’s corporate executive chef, overseeing the culinary side of dining operations, including the planning of menus, production and more. Chef Gallovitch, a native of Bulgaria with classical European culinary training, has many years of experience working in different kitchens with different chefs throughout his professional career.


Q: Tell me a little about yourself and your background in dining.

I have been a chef for the last 20 years. I have extensive experience working with different chefs from all over the world. I started my career working for Sheraton Hotels in Europe. I also worked in a major strip resort in Las Vegas for 12 years. I’ve also been an executive chef of an upscale steakhouse, district chef for a large university for 10 years, and a regional chef for a company responsible for running events around the country and Canada.

Q: Tell me what you do here at Miami, the different tasks you are responsible for and what role you play in our dining services as a whole.

I am the corporate executive chef of Miami University. I am responsible for all of the dining facilities, chefs, Catering, and Concessions. My job is to oversee the operations, and provide guidance, planning menus, production, and special events.

Q: The theme for National Nutrition Month this year is “Put Your Best Fork Forward” to emphasize that each of us holds the tool to make healthier food choices. What does this theme mean to you and in what ways do you believe people can make healthy changes to their diets during National Nutrition Month and beyond?

To eat healthy starts with the choice of ingredients for the recipes. Focusing on things likes high quality ingredients, freshness, and local sourcing can greatly improve the nutrition content of the foods we consume. Balanced diet greatly depends on the choices each individual makes and making small changes to your diet can add up over time. Choosing the right nutrient-rich food can greatly improve our health and energy levels during our daily activities.

Q: In what ways do you think students at Miami can “Put their best fork forward”?

My suggestions for a healthy diet would be eating more of the following foods: vegetables, fruits, low fat dairy, whole grain foods, lean meats, legumes, and using high quality oils while preparing your food.


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